Archive Monthly Archives: June 2017

Who Else is Using Your Email Address

Imagine this scenario. You get into your office in the morning and start checking your email. Everything seems business as usual, until you come upon an email that tells you that your email to someone has failed. You look and don't recall sending an email to that email address. You don't even know who that email address belongs to!

This isn't an uncommon scenario. As email has become the primary method of communication for businesses, more and more people are trying to figure out how to gain access to email addresses to send spam emails or access sensitive or valuable information. If you feel this has happened to you, don't freak out. It's probably one of two situations.

  • 1
    Your email has been spoofed. This is the most common one. It's when a spammer sends spam emails but makes it look like they're coming from your email address. The spammer does not have access to your inbox but any replies to the spoofed emails will show up in your inbox. There's not much you can do about this. Frankly, spoofing email addresses are very easy to do. Having your email address spoofed is annoying but your data is safe.
  • 2
    Create a policy that forces your users to change their email password every 60 or 90 days.

It won't prevent anyone from spoofing your email address but you can at least feel confident that if someone had access to your inbox they don't anymore. Here's a few more things you can do to make your email inbox hack-proof.


​As always, if you have any more questions or need help we're here for you!

  • 1
    Create a policy that forces your users to change their email password every 60 or 90 days.
  • 2
    Turn on Two-Factor Authentication for your email address.
  • 3
    If you check your email from your phone, make sure that your phone requires a separate password or pin.

If you have any questions or concerns, don't hesitate to let us know.  That's what we're here for.

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Windows 10 Creators Update

Back in April Microsoft began to release the newest build of Windows 10, dubbed the "Creator's Update". And that's when the wheels began to fall off. As the update was pushed out to more and more PC's we began to get more calls about user's having internet issues after the update was installed. Being IT professionals who like to preach keeping PC's up to date, we poured a lot of time into finding a fix for the issue while allowing people to keep the update. But it seems rolling your computer back is the only option to truly fix the internet issues caused by the Creator's Update. Now that news has surfaced that Microsoft has accidentally released experimental versions of a newer Creator's Update that is also causing problems, we thought it was time to bring up the subject.

First off, not everyone who installs the Creator's Update has an issue with it. We haven't been able to find a trend in the PC's that do have an issue. But I would still recommend installing it first to see if you will have any issues.

If you install it and begin to notice issues then you can follow the instructions below to roll back your computer. Then once you do that we will include some instructions on how to defer those builds from installing in the future.

I would certainly suggest calling us, or whoever your IT provider is first. But if you're in a pinch and need a solution now, you're welcome to follow the steps below.


Before you begin rolling back to previous builds, it's crucial that you confirm that you have the Creator's Update. If you do not but think you do and decide to roll your computer back, you could potentially roll your computer back 6 months by accident.

  • 1
    Open the "Run" box by hitting the Windows key + R keyboard shortcut.
  • 2
    Type "Winver" in the run box and hit enter.
  • 3
    A screen like the one below should appear. If you have the Creator's Update you'll see version 1703 below Microsoft Windows. As you can see below, I do not have the Creator's Update.
    SMXLL

So once you have confirmed that you do have the Creator's Update here's how to remove it.

  • 1
    Click the Start Menu -> Settings -> Update & Security.
  • 2
    Click Recovery.
  • 3
    You should now see an option to "Roll Back to Previous Builds".
  • 4
    Select that and follow the prompts.

​Now that you know that the Creator's Update has caused issues on your PC and you've removed it. Now let's prevent it from installing again. Don't worry, after you do this you'll continue to get security patches just not the new build.

  • 1
    Click the Start Menu -> Settings -> Update & Security.
  • 2
    Under Windows Update select "Advanced Options".
  • 3
    Then put a check box in "Defer Feature Updates".
    SMXLL

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